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Is Jeuveau Better than Botox?

Since it was first approved by the FDA in 2002, the Botox brand has become the Kleenex of forehead-wrinkle relaxing neurotoxins. When injected in small doses into the underlying muscles of the face, it can paralyze the muscular function responsible for wrinkles, thus creating smooth, wrinkle-free skin.

Before & After Photo Gallery

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Real Patients. Real Results. View before & after images of vein and cosmetic procedures in our photo gallery.

What is Jeuveau?

Although newer competitors, such as Dysport and Xeomin, have gained popularity in treating dynamic expression lines – wrinkles or lines that are visible when we express ourselves, such as frown lines, lines on the forehead, and crow’s feet and smile lines around the eyes –  Botox remains the most popular brand. However, for the first time in nearly a decade, the FDA gave the go-ahead to a new neurotoxin – Jeuveau. “NEWTOX”, as it’s also known, is structurally identical to the others.

What Is the Difference Between Jeuveau and Botox?

Jeuveau works just like the other injectable neurotoxins – it relaxes facial muscles via a paralytic effect. Jeuveau is a botulism toxin type A, a new wrinkle-relaxing injectable that’s very similar to the other neuromodulators. It can be used in any area that Botox is used, both for cosmetic and medical reasons. Like all of the other neurotoxins, Jeuveau is FDA-approved to temporarily improve the appearance of frown lines between the eyebrows — the “11s”, but medically known as the glabellar lines.  Injectors also use the neurotoxins off-label to treat other areas such as the crow’s feet and smile lines around the eyes. Jeuveau is produced from different strains of the same toxin. The risks and potential side effects listed by the companies are also identical.

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To learn more, schedule your consultation with Dr. Schwartz by filling out the form on this page or by calling his practice at (913) 451-8346. Premier Vein & Body by Schwartz serves patients throughout the Kansas City metro.

Is Jeuveau Better than Botox?

Each wrinkle relaxer on the market has a similar effect but slightly different personality — not necessarily better, but just different from others. Anecdotal evidence from subjects report that the results of Jeuveau may last longer than those of its competitors based on the company’s initial data; however, there has not been enough clinical research to make any concrete conclusions.  Subtle variations like the strain of toxin used or the presence of proteins in the drug’s formula explain why one drug might be more beneficial to a specific patient. Botox and Xeomin use the same strain of botulinum toxin, while Dysport and Jeuveau are different strains of botulinum toxin.

Premier Vein & Body offers a full array of wrinkle treatments, including Botox, Xeomin, and Juveau. No one wants to look older than they feel, and our medical director, Dr. Craig Schwartz, has an exceptional eye for detail and strives to achieve the perfect non-surgical anti-aging solution for you. He is passionate about making you look and feel your best and will guide you through the often confusing options for the best overall wrinkle treatment and facial rejuvenation.

Testimonials

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5/5

Read from real patients about their experiences with Dr. Schwartz and his team at Premier Vein & Body by Schwartz.

Take the Next Step

If you have further questions about Jeuveau or Botox, call us at (913) 451-8346 or fill out our online contact form. We look forward to meeting you and showing you how Kansas City’s premier vein treatment center can improve your condition.

Premier Vein & Body proudly serves the entire Kansas City metro area.

** This blog provides general information and discussion about medicine, health and related subjects.  The words and other content provided in this blog, and in any linked materials, are not intended and should not be construed as medical advice. If the reader or any other person has a medical concern, he or she should consult with an appropriately licensed physician.

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